by:

AANY: Who are you and where are you from? Carrie: Carrie Patterson from Dallas, Texas, originally from Oklahoma. I’ve been in Dallas for around 8 years. AANY: What do you do? Carrie: I work for a foster care and an adoption agency in Plano, Texas. We place foster kids in foster homes through child protective… Read more »

by:

Rick Ulfik, Founder and Board Chair of “We, The World”. Founder and a Principal Organizer of the WE Campaign at WE.net. UN Representative of Communications Coordination Committee for the UN, and Co-producer of Visual Voices TV Series, which was featured on the Dish Network and available in 15 million homes. Rick organizes and promotes scores… Read more »

by:

Last night, walking through Rockefeller Center a memory struck me like a brick. In 1970 the best bang for the buck in New York City was Radio City Music Hall. My sixteenth year was a very good one. After my last class at LaSalle Academy around 2pm, I’d take the # 6 subway at Bleecker… Read more »

by:

My Uncle Jack and Aunt Anna were having marital problems in the early 1940s. Their fighting hit a new high in their East Harlem neighborhood when Aunt Anna found half her house money missing from the flour tin. She chased Uncle Jack with a ladle full of dog crap up First Avenue to the entrance of the 138th Street Bridge.  Jack ran into… Read more »

by:

There comes a time in the life of every serious Sex and the City tour guide when she’s forced to contemplate her field’s most insurmountable theoretical quandary: What is your favorite episode? My answer is as complicated as anyone’s, but when I’m in a pressure situation I’ve always relied on one response: “Hot Child in… Read more »

by:

Last Thursday night, my husband and I went to a party that Esquire Magazine* hosted at a 23.5 million dollar apartment.  The apartment, known as the ClockTower Penthouse, is a triplex in DUMBO, Brooklyn, and is the most expensive piece of real estate in the borough.  The main floor features four enormous working glass clock… Read more »

by:

Nearing the 1964 Christmas break during my fifth grade, thirteen inches of snow blanketed my street late on a Thursday evening. Losing a school day to the elements was a beautiful thing. Friday morning, my friends and I mushed over to Central Park towing our sleds through the middle of the street. Milking the day… Read more »